ESP Project  Eastern State Penitentiary Philadelphia, PA   April 3rd, 2010    It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.  When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.  Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

ESP Project
Eastern State Penitentiary
Philadelphia, PA  
April 3rd, 2010
 

It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.

When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.

Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

  ESP Project  Eastern State Penitentiary Philadelphia, PA   April 3rd, 2010    It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.  When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.  Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

ESP Project
Eastern State Penitentiary
Philadelphia, PA  
April 3rd, 2010
 

It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.

When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.

Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

  ESP Project  Eastern State Penitentiary Philadelphia, PA   April 3rd, 2010    It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.  When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.  Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

ESP Project
Eastern State Penitentiary
Philadelphia, PA  
April 3rd, 2010
 

It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.

When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.

Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

  ESP Project  Eastern State Penitentiary Philadelphia, PA   April 3rd, 2010    It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.  When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.  Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

ESP Project
Eastern State Penitentiary
Philadelphia, PA  
April 3rd, 2010
 

It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.

When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.

Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

  ESP Project  Eastern State Penitentiary Philadelphia, PA   April 3rd, 2010    It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.  When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.  Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

ESP Project
Eastern State Penitentiary
Philadelphia, PA  
April 3rd, 2010
 

It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.

When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.

Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

  ESP Project  Eastern State Penitentiary Philadelphia, PA   April 3rd, 2010    It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.  When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.  Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

ESP Project
Eastern State Penitentiary
Philadelphia, PA  
April 3rd, 2010
 

It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.

When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.

Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

  ESP Project  Eastern State Penitentiary Philadelphia, PA   April 3rd, 2010    It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.  When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.  Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

ESP Project
Eastern State Penitentiary
Philadelphia, PA  
April 3rd, 2010
 

It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.

When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.

Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

  ESP Project  Eastern State Penitentiary Philadelphia, PA   April 3rd, 2010    It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.  When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.  Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

ESP Project
Eastern State Penitentiary
Philadelphia, PA  
April 3rd, 2010
 

It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.

When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.

Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

  ESP Project  Eastern State Penitentiary Philadelphia, PA   April 3rd, 2010    It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.  When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.  Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

ESP Project
Eastern State Penitentiary
Philadelphia, PA  
April 3rd, 2010
 

It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.

When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.

Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

  ESP Project  Eastern State Penitentiary Philadelphia, PA   April 3rd, 2010    It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.  When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.  Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

ESP Project
Eastern State Penitentiary
Philadelphia, PA  
April 3rd, 2010
 

It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.

When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.

Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

  ESP Project  Eastern State Penitentiary Philadelphia, PA   April 3rd, 2010    It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.  When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.  Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

ESP Project
Eastern State Penitentiary
Philadelphia, PA  
April 3rd, 2010
 

It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.

When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.

Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

  ESP Project  Eastern State Penitentiary Philadelphia, PA   April 3rd, 2010    It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.  When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.  Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

ESP Project
Eastern State Penitentiary
Philadelphia, PA  
April 3rd, 2010
 

It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.

When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.

Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

  ESP Project  Eastern State Penitentiary Philadelphia, PA   April 3rd, 2010    It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.  When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.  Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

ESP Project
Eastern State Penitentiary
Philadelphia, PA  
April 3rd, 2010
 

It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.

When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.

Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

  ESP Project  Eastern State Penitentiary Philadelphia, PA   April 3rd, 2010    It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.  When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.  Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

ESP Project
Eastern State Penitentiary
Philadelphia, PA  
April 3rd, 2010
 

It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.

When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.

Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

  ESP Project  Eastern State Penitentiary Philadelphia, PA   April 3rd, 2010    It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.  When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.  Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.

ESP Project
Eastern State Penitentiary
Philadelphia, PA  
April 3rd, 2010
 

It is a unique opportunity to make work for a space that so heavily breathes on its own. The Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners for over 140 years and emanates possibilities for conceptual stimulation. The penitentiary's embryonic interior offers a heightened visceral experience, which I intended to transmit through my performance and installation.

When social hierarchies surrender to a deconstructed commodity, we capture a glimpse into a more utopian society. On April 3rd, 2010, nine hundred and eighty (980) urns lined Cellblock Ten at the Eastern State Penitentiary. All of the art pieces were to be given away to the public on this day. In form, the urns echo the interior space of the prison cells. All the pieces were gilded with 23-karat gold leaf on the backside, as well as an individual numbering system on the front from 1 through 980. This represented the number of individual cells in the penitentiary. Participants were escorted through the cellblock with an ESP guide. Each participant then selected an urn whereby the guide escorted him/her outside to release the piece to its recipient. Within this audience-interactive art performance, I hoped to create a transformative experience for both the participant and the space in which the event occurred.

Since the Eastern State Penitentiary held prisoners who took the lives and possessions of others, I wanted to reverse this history and destructive energy through the act of giving.